Augmented Reality & Virtual reality

Leap Motions New AR Headset All But Guarantees Your Public Humiliation

Leap Motion’s New AR Headset All But Guarantees Your Public Humiliation

Leap Motion, the company behind the weird gesture-tracking controller for PC and VR, is showing off some pretty interesting tech in the form of an AR headset reference design. Whether or not you’ll be able to get your hands on the concept, which incorporates the company’s gesture control hardware, is another story. After all, it’s not the first open-source mixed reality headset, and doesn’t exactly look good. You know, now that I think about it, who exactly is going to bother making this thing besides Leap Motion itself? Leap Motion announced the North Star augmented reality platform in a series of blog posts documenting the construction of the prototype headset, its design, and desired goal of the project. The system doesn’t exactly exist, though. Instead of creating an actual headset, Leap Motion is letting everyone under the sun have at it by releasing the hardware and software specifications under an open source license.

ASUS ZENFONE ARES WITH SNAPDRAGON 821, 8 GB RAM LAUNCHED SPECIFICATIONS AND FEATURES

Asus Zenfone Ares With Snapdragon 821, 8 Gb Ram Launched: Specifications And Features

As of now, there is no news of the device coming to the India market, and is limited to Taiwan for now. The Asus Zenfone Ares features a 5.7-inch Super AMOLED display with a 16:9 aspect ratio, and QHD resolution of 1440 x 2560 pixels. Under the hood, the smartphone is powered by a Snapdragon 821 chipset, which is accompanied with 8 GB of RAM and 128GB of storage. The smartphone’s hardware is compatible with Google‘s ARCore technology. In terms of camera, the Zenfone Ares sports a 23 MP sensor, which has a high-res PixelMaster 3.0 lens. The camera also features motion tracking and depth sensing to enable Augmented Reality Experience. Up front, the smartphone sports a 8 MP sensor. The Zenfone Ares runs Android Nougat out-of-the-box. Fueling the device is a 3,300mAh battery, which comes with Quick Charge 3.0 support.

Google

Google Working on Standalone AR Headset With Cameras and Voice Input: Report

Google is reportedly working on a standalone Augmented Reality (AR) headset, codenamed Google A65, according to documents obtained by German news site. The Mountain View firm is said to be working with Taiwanese manufacturer Quanta on the AR headset, the same company that was involved in the production of the Pixel C tablet that was launched in 2015, WinFuture claimed in a report on Friday. The headset is expected to include camera sensors and microphones to allow users operate the device using Google Assistant. It is said to be powered by a custom quad-core IoT chip from Qualcomm, the QSC603 that supports resolutions up to 2,560 x 1,440 resolution, apart from 1080p and 1030p video capture, 3D overlays, Open GL, Open CL, Vulcan rendering interfaces support; Gigabit wireless, Bluetooth 5.1, and GPS connectivity, and the Android Neural Networks API.

Naked Labs raises $14M Series A led by Founders Fund for its 3D body scanning mirror

Naked Labs raises $14M Series A led by Founders Fund for its 3D body scanning mirror

When it comes to measuring your fitness progress, there’s only so much your weight scale can tell you, actually there’s only one thing it can convey. That one metric hardly encapsulates all of the successes that active people are looking to achieve. Naked Labs believes that body shape is a more important thing to measure and they’ve begun shipping their body-scanning mirror that builds a 3D model of users and alerts them where progress is being made and where there’s potential for more work to be done. The startup also announced today that it has raised a $14 million Series A led by Founders Fund. Also participating were NEA, Lumia Capital, Venture 51, Seabed VC, among others. The company began taking pre-orders last year for its $1,395 Naked 3D Fitness Tracker.

How to Launch Your Own Augmented Reality Rocket into the Real World Skies

How to Launch Your Own Augmented Reality Rocket into the Real World Skies

Have you been noticing SpaceX and its launches lately? Ever imagined how it would feel to launch your own rocket into the sky? Well, imagine no longer! In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to make a simple augmented reality app for iPads and iPhones by using ARKit. Specifically, we’ll go over how we can launch a rocket into the sky and ensure that it keeps flying based on “world tracking.”

What Will You Learn?

We’ll be learning how to animate 3D objects in the AR world based on real world physical constraints. We’ll also get some help by using the hitTest and plane detection details we covered previously.

Magic Leap Unveils Two New Demos Showing How Spatial Computing Works1

Magic Leap Unveils Two New Demos Showing How Spatial Computing Works

The long and slow road toward the actual release of the Magic Leap One appears to be accelerating, with a couple of new demonstrations of how the system works revealed in this week’s creator’s portal updates along with the company’s developer documentation. Following the much talked about demo called “Dodge,” the new demos (actually, tutorials), shot directly through the device, are called “Drive” and “Measure” and deliver two new valuable looks at exactly how the Magic Leap system works. “Mobile apps exist already that can do small scale measurements, but they are limited by a tiny screen,” reads Magic Leap’s documentation, which is a clear reference to the abundance of augmented reality measuring apps currently available for mobile devices via ARKit and ARCore.

Snapchat Adds Speech-Activated Lenses to Its Augmented Reality Capabilities

Snapchat Adds Speech-Activated Lenses to Its Augmented Reality Capabilities

Snapchat users are used to raising their eyebrows or opening their mouths to activate augmented reality face effects. Now, they get to use their voices as well. On Wednesday, the speech-activated Lenses will begin appearing in the carousel and will continue to show up occasionally from here on out. The first voice-activated examples include saying “okay” to add corresponding stickers, and saying “love” to activate a flourish of hearts (awww). Other examples include saying “wow” to prompt a camera zoom or stickers popping up in the background, or saying “hi” to summon a flock of digital ducks. At launch, Snapchat will only respond to a select list of English words, with on-screen prompts for the user to repeat. The new capability is an extension of the sound recognition capability that Snapchat rolled out earlier this year. In fact, Snapchat’s engineers have been extra busy adding new capabilities to the AR experiences of late, including body tracking and sky segmentation.

App That Puts SpaceX Launches on Your Tabletop Boosts Augmented Reality’s Flight into the Mainstream

App That Puts SpaceX Launches on Your Tabletop Boosts Augmented Reality’s Flight into the Mainstream

The mainstreaming of augmented reality won’t happen overnight, but it’s becoming increasingly clear that traditional media is leading the charge in the effort to introduce the public to immersive computing. A recent example came from none other than USA Today via its 321 Launch app. Back in March, the media company teamed up with Florida Today to allow their readers to immersively experience real space launches from the comfort of their homes, and now the makers of the app are revealing just how well the app did in terms of reader engagement. According to the Florida Today team, the app has garnered roughly 100,000 downloads during its relatively short life, an impressive number when you consider that the app doesn’t involve catching virtual monsters and is instead focused on education and news.

Augmented Reality Recreates A New York City Not Seen for Centuries1

Augmented Reality Recreates A New York City Not Seen for Centuries

If you’re looking to augment your walking tour of New York, but you grew tired of catching pokémon, shooting zombies, and hiding virtual graffiti, there’s a new AR app to help you make more of your stroll through the Big Apple. Inventing America is a new AR experience mapped to real-world Governor’s Island, an (yep you guessed it) island that sits squarely in the East River, due East of the Statue of Liberty. Today, Governor’s Island is a scenic destination broken up into a small national park and several historic sites. But originally, it was a seasonal outpost for Native Americans (who inhabited the whole region) to set up camp and collect fish. The British arrived, and the island changed hands several times between the English and Dutch — specifically, the West India Company, which made the island the base of its operations.